Learning Never Stops At BAC!

The Boston Ability Center takes pride in completing additional specialized trainings and learning about new research to provide best patient care. Last week, three of our BAC clinicians traveled to Portland, ME to take part in a four day training in the SOS Approach To Feeding.

The SOS Approach focuses on increasing a child’s comfort level by exploring and learning about the different properties of food. The program allows a child to interact with food in a playful, non-stressful way, beginning with the ability to tolerate the food in the room and in front of him/her; then moving on to touching, putting on lips, and eventually tasting and eating foods.

At the conference, clinicians learned that children who participated in a twelve week feeding group that used the SOS method increased their number of accepted foods by 41% (Boyd, 2007).

Whether your child is a picky eater, problem feeder, or somewhere in between, come see us at the Boston Ability Center to schedule a feeding evaluation and learn more.

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Looking For An Exciting Science Experiment For Your Little One?

Our friends at BAC LOVE science and learning! We hope you enjoy the “Color Surprise Experiment” that you and your little one can do together. You can have fun while practicing your child’s speech/language skills- see home ideas below!

Print pictures below and cut cards. Have your child put the cards in order and then retell the order of the activity using complete sentences (e.g., “FIRST, I poured the glue.”)
Ask wh-questions to encourage conversation, support problem solving skills and practice understanding of WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHY and YES/NO! 

In The Ocean…

Our occupational therapist, Stephanie, targets both fine motor and gross motor skills while finding baby fish in our “sea hammock”!

During this activity our friend was encouraged to utilize his gross motor skills to climb through the various layers of the “sea” (aka: hammock) to find the fish. Subsequently he used his fine motor skills to pinch the baby fish-clips and attach them back onto the mother fish! Not only was this activity fun and motivating, but it also supported numerous developmental skills.